Stand up for mental health!

i subscribe to an email newsletter from The Learning Strategies Corporation and i thought i’d share something they sent me a few weeks ago. Here’s their newsletter, then i’ll conclude with a comment below it:

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Welcome to Health Sparks
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How many hours did you spend sitting yesterday? Consider your drive to work, time spent at your desk, an afternoon meeting, gathering around the dinner table, and catching the nightly news.
For many, it adds up quickly. And it could be taking a toll on your mental and emotional wellbeing.
Your brain’s functioning depends on blood flow, which is decreased by prolonged sitting, says Linda Wasmer Andrews, author of the Encyclopedia of Depression, in an article published in Psychology Today. Andrews sites three recent studies that have assessed the psychological effects of sitting:
  1. In a study of over 3,000 government employees in Tasmania, Australia, those who sat over six hours each workday scored higher on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, which measures anxiety and depression experienced in the past four weeks, than those who sat less than six hours per day. The results were consistent, regardless of the participants’ activity levels outside of work.
  2. The American Journal of Preventive Medicine studied 9,000 women in their fifties and found those who sat seven hours or more per day and were otherwise physically inactive were three times more likely to suffer from depression than those who sat fewer than four hours per day. “The relationship between sitting and depression may be a two-way street,” says Andrews. Depression decreases a person’s energy and motivation, and prolonged sitting is likely to make it worse.
  3. Researchers from the Society of Behavior Medicine studied men and women to determine if time spent sitting outside of work—watching TV, using a computer, riding in a vehicle, and socializing—impacted mental wellbeing. For women, non-work hours spent sitting, regardless of which activity, had a negative effect. For men, only non-work hours spent on a computer had significant negative impact.
“Consider how you spend your free time: It’s important to make time for the gym or a regular run. But don’t count on even a daily half-hour of exercise to completely cancel out the unhealthy, unhappy effects of 11 hours in a chair,” says Andrews. “If you have a desk job, seek opportunities to add more activity breaks to your day.”
Even breaks as short as a minute can help.

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The more we learn about sitting, folks, the more we find how damaging it is to our health, and this study talks about its impact on our spirits. One thing i love about this is where it says “even breaks as short as a minute can help.  If you’re a client of an Egoscue clinic and you sit a lot for whatever reason, ask your therapist to give you a short menu to help counteract your sitting time. if i have a client, for example, who has a deskjob i’ll give them an “office menu” where i give them very short things they can do during their day to break up and counteract the limited motion patterns of extended sitting. Your therapist will be happy to give you one if they haven’t already.

 

So now that you’ve read this blog post, get up and move!

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Explore posts in the same categories: Egoscue, General, Nutrition and Health

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